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Greta Van Susteren

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  FOX News    Greta Van Susteren    News/Business. Journalist and  
   guests discuss current events.  

    April 6, 2010
    1:00 - 2:00am EDT  

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you can come to any of the shows go to hannity.com and we a lot of pictures. i think >> at this hour, the death toll has risen in montcoal. 12 miners have been confirmed dead, killed by this explosion. at least nine rescue teams are frantically searching for 10 others who are missing. the upper big branch is located in the rugged mountains ever raleigh county. here's the map. that county's about 30 miles south of charleston. the explosion happened about 3:00 p.m. eastern time and believed to have been spark bide methane gas. complicating the rescue effort, the communications system that the mine was knocked out in that blast. the mine does have extra oxygen
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and air-tight chambers underground, equipped to keep the miners alive up to four days during emergencies like this. rescuers say there is some evidence to believe that trapped miners are using that oxygen underground. joining us by phone is shawna johnson. she's with west virginia metro news. shawna, are you there on the scene? >> i'm in charleston. the cell service is so spotty at the scene itself, we are relaying information out as we can. >> yeah. i understand, it's a remote area. what's the latest? what are you learning there? >> reporter: you covered most of it. we learned within the past hour that 12 miners have been killed in this explosion. what mine officials are saying to us over and over again is that this is very much a rescue operation, not a recovery operation. they believe there are still 10 miners in that mine. and at this point, they believe they may have made their way to
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one of the two underground mine rescue chambers that are required after the sago mine disaster which was also in west virginia in a different part of the state. but they have signs and are hoping that mine rescue teams within the next several hours can make it to one of these chambers and will find the 10 miners, okay, inside. i know that this unfortunately happened, you covered this probably on several ocages in west virginia. what are the chances of finding these last 10 that are trapped underground? do you think all 10 of them are in the chambers? i know this is speculation. but in your experience, covering this type of thing? >> reporter: this is one of the first major disasters where these underground chambers have actually been in place. they were not an option for the miners at the sago mine. but we do know they are there and by law, they have to be located within a certain amount of the working space of the mine, where the miners are actually working. so they do have a chance to get
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there. also, we learned from state officials and federal officials last hour, there was a separate area, a stash, if you will, of self-contained self-rescuers, meaning emergency oxygen. the miners carry some with them. but then there is also this stash. and they said mine rescue teams did see indications that someone had gotten into that stash at some point, most likely after the explosion. >> goch a. those are the scsrs. i was listening to the press conference. >> reporter: the self-contained self-rescuers. that was another requirement after sago that have you to have certain amounts of emergency oxygen stashed along possible exit routes of the mine. >> this was part of the mine improvement and new emergency response act of 2006 and it says all mine his to comply with this by 2009. like you were saying, this is very new. we haven't had the chambers. they weren't required until 200.
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>> reporter: right. those are changes after two mine accidents in west virginia, sago and then an underground fire several weeks in logan county. so this new law is really being put to the test tonight. >> i know in the sago disaster, there was -- there was an area set aside, a church that was close by where the families could gather and congregate. there were prayer vigils going on. i know there is the first baptist church where families were encouraged to go. do you know anything about that and what type of prayer vigils or gatherings they are having there? >> reporter: from what i understand, the family members who are most immediately impacted, either somehow connect to the miners who have died or are missing, are all gathered there. there are a number of state officials and federal officials there talking with them. the investigators are going to talk to the family members in the separate area before talking to the media. so the push was to try to get to these chambers within a couple of hours. they are hoping to talk to the
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families again at 2:00 and brief the media again at 3:00. >> good to know. we will be up on that. what about rescue equipment? do you know anything about the rescue equipment or how they go underground and get these individuals out? >> reporter: they send in teams of highly skilled people, mine rescue teams that are specifically trained to do just this. from the reports that we have at this point, the people best equipped to go in and get to where they are are on site or providing assistance and information over the phone, many other ways. so most of the mine rescue teams are down there at this point in west virginia. they have nine teams in the mine at this point. and they go to a certain area, there is a certain protocol that you follow once you get underground. but it is not like you walk in. you, of course, have to be suited up appropriately, go a certain amount, monitor the air quality and proceed from there. what we have found out and this is significant, is that the air
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quality is actually getting better, which is good because that indicates that there is not still a fire burning underground. >> right. i know that they do have testers to detect methane and oxygen and carbon monoxide and various poisonous gases before they go in. we are told that this was sparked by methane gas. do you know anything more about the explosion itself? >> reporter: i have hearding hed nothing on the cause. >> do you remember at the beginning of the night or yesterday afternoon, we were learning that seven individuals were killed. now that death toll has ris tone 12. but the seven, we were told, they were leaving in a vehicle, not trying to leave -- they did not obviously know the explosion was going to occur, but they were driving away when the explosion happened and seven individuals in the vehicle were killed and then two others in the vehicle were injured? >> reporter: yeah. they're in a man trip, which is what carries the miners in and out of the might be. it was actually around shift change so they were preparing to leave, from the reports that we
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have. so the initial explosion -- there was a group of workers from the reports that we have that were nearby. and after the explosion, they were able to help those initial nine miners, seven were killed; two injured. so that was immediately after that. and then the five additional bodies that were found late this evening were said to be, according to state officials, between 1,000 and 2,000 feet away from the man trip. they're believed to have been killed in nainitial explosion as well. >> really? now the two that survived, were those the two that were transported to the hospital. we were reporting that two were injured? >> reporter: two injured and in the last briefing they said that one had died at the hospital. >> one had died at the hospital-- >> reporter: who was among the initial round of miners. do you know any of these individuals? did you grow up in this area? >> reporter: no. i don't. >> are you hearing anything about the families or what is happening on the site and how close they can get to the mine itself? >> reporter: the area is most
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likely -- if it is a church, it is likely a little bit away from the site. if you cover -- if you cover these events enough, you know that -- this... they're gathered together away from the media. we don't have any access to them and they just wait. i don't know if you can imagine how difficult that would be. you would just wait for information. so that's where they are at this point. >> how used to -- i know you never get used to a tragedy like this -- but the towns there, most everyone's a miner? >> reporter: yeah, not most everyone's a miner. most everyone knows a miner. >> whoops in these situations? >> reporter: a community rallies and you wait for word exo hope for the best. >> okay. anything else you want to add, shawna? anything i am forgetting to ask? >> reporter: no. hopefully, we will have an update in a couple of hours. >> let me ask you one more question about violations. are you familiar with the violations that this mine has experienced in the past? i know that there have been
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some? >> reporter: i have looked at their violations, but i don't know enough to inteek to it. i looked at recent violations. >> hopefully, we will get more information as the night progresses and we might be talking to you later. thanks for staying up with us. >> reporter: no problem. >> i am holding a stack of violations, a 47-page document, printed on the united states department of labor web site. you can go there and you can enter any of the names of the mines throughout the united states and it will tell you the history of violations. but you really have to be han expert to go through all of these papers and know what you are looking for. it's a list of citation, orders and safeguards and 47 pages seems a lot to me. but i haven't been able to compare it to other mines in the area to find out how big those stacks or small those stacks might be. so we will continue to research that. thanks for joining us. to recap, there was a mine explosion in west virginia at 3:00 yesterday afternoon.
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today is tuesday, i have to get my days straight, eastern time, it's 1:09 in the morning here at fox in new york. and this happened yesterday at 3:00 p.m. 10 trapped underground, 12 have been reported killed so far and two have been injured and taken to area hospitals. families have been notified. i am not sure if all of the families involved have been notified. they are not releasing the names at this point. originally, there were seven individuals that were killed. i know that those family members have been notified. but then, over the last few hours, we have realized that five others, based on a press conference that happened about an hour ago, five others have also been killed. so the death toll is now at 12. we will continue to keep you posted throughout the night. i'm ainsley earhardt. we return to "on the record," already in progress. and it is going to fall again. there's 100,000 new people who enter the workforce each month. it is going to take 250,000 new jobs a month for the next
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three years just to get the unemployment rate down to 8% which is still a high unemployment rate for the united states. >> greta: when i saw this number knowing we were so with the 168,000 jobs in march i read 250,000 each month for three years the only thing i could hope is thank you were dead wrong on that number. >> i wish i were. we've got a big labor force, eight million people lost their jobs in the last two years since this recession started. it takes a long time to get americans back to work. we have to generate twice as many jobs as we did in this last report to start bringing this unemployment rate down. >> greta: indeed that's what we hope to do and want too do. steve, thank you. in two minutes, tiger woods in his own words. he talks about his stint in sex rehab. his tear car accident.
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and -- his mysterious car accident and whether his wife is with him at the masters tournament. on the record special guest. you get answers directly from senate majority leader harry reid. we do lock horns over the so-called cornhusker kickback. the true price of the health care bill and much, much more. that's minutes away.
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. >> greta: what tiger woods is trying to get at talking to you. getting ready for his big come back. first tiger woods taking questions at a news conference. >> are you still in rehab and what is that rehab for? >> i was in there to take a hard look at myself and i did. i've come out better. certainly a much better person for it than i was going in.
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does that mean i'm ever going to stop doing that? no. i will still continue with my treatment. >> what was it for? >> that's personal. >> was there a time prior to that you thought you needed therapy? did you ever try to quit whatever it was? >> no, i was not in that frame of mind. >> did ambien play a role in the car crash? were you described by witnesses as mumling, snoring, sockless and according to hospital report admitted as a possible od. >> the police investigated the accident and they cited me $166. >> what sent you to the hospital? >> i had a busted up lip. and a pretty sore neck. an that was it. -- and that was. >> five stitches. >> could you had been playing better had you had more discipline in your personal life? >> i would like to say yes.
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>> is there some element of you that wanted to get caught? >> i don't all i know is i acted poorly. made just bad decisions. >> how did you fool so many people for so long? >> tom, i fooled myself as well. as i said, i lied to a lot of people. a lot of people. kept others in the dark. >> will elin and the kids be joining you for the masters? [ inaudible ] >> elin is not coming this week, no. >> greta: joining us live in augusta, georgia, executive editor for golf world. how has tiger woods been playing lately in the days and weeks later --or6hr -- leading p to this tournament? >> this is the first we've seen him in five weeks and he was a little erratic which is to be expected when you have
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been away from competition that long. you can practice all you want. but you don't get the sense of until you in that situation. he's going to be experiencing a pressure this week that he hasn't experienced in a long time. >> greta: ron, what does it mean to golf if he wins the tournament? what does it mean if he loses? to him. here's what tiger woods has to do, he has to change the conversation away from his personal life into his professional life. the way to do that is to win. america loves a winner. they will forgive a lot if you you can seed. we've been talking for five months about his personal life. he needs to shift that conversation and get people asking golf questions. >> greta: it is interesting, when he was out of game i heard the golf revenues went down in so many different ways. i'm wondering if he doesn't make a comeback what does it
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mean for the gust this sport? >> the main and immediate impact is on the tv ratings of those events that he normally plays in. those ratings go down, unquestionably. the business model for the pga tour is solid. they've got contracts that extends several years in advance. does tiger woods give them something may have never had the most famous athlete in the world? absolutely. it doesn't mean that the business model is broken. it does mean that those events that he plays in the tv ratings are going to take a hit. >> greta: is he likely to be heckled on the golf course? >> i don't think so. this is augusta. these fans have been coming here for generations. they tend to be knowledgeable, restrained. i was on the tee today when he hit his first shot there was polite applause. they withheld their approval from him, not by booing but by not cheering.
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>> greta: thank you sir. next, quick quiz: which former nfl star is running for congress? what party or group does he claim affiliation? democrat, republican or tea party? start guessing. you are going to meet him next. >> plus, this is big. harry reid goes on the record. how does he explain the so-called cornhusker kickback? is he worried he will lose in november? find out minutes from now, from the senator.
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career is in jeopardy and he's trying to vote as as his constituents would this being a traditionally republican district. trying to match in an effort to save his job. >> greta: you have a primary. how do you distinguish yourself from your competitor within the same party? >> i think it is a big thing of being yourself and going out and taking care of your business. i relate that back to things i experienced in the nfl. you don't worry about your opponent all the time. you do what you can do. put your work in. put your beliefs out there. the voters are going to make the decision. you don't really have to worry about it. >> greta: do you have any concern or worry that the tea party movement in any way is going to create an issue for the republican party
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nationally for the midterm election? >> well, i think when you look at the tea party in general, we both have very conservative value us. no matter where you are on the spectrum, you are going to agree and disagree on certain things. i think the biggest thing where i come from my stance is take a lot of common sense. special interests are getting in the way. that's what a lot of people are upset about. if you keep the doors open and don't slam 'em shut with special interests just allow people to have conversations i think that's where a lot of people are looking to go. >> greta: what is the story about donovan mcnabb you played with him, why the redskins what is that going to do with the redskins and eagles? >> eagles had three starting quarterbacks on the roster they were able to shop each one individually. ultimately ended up being donovan going to washington which surprised a lot of
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people around here, special lit fact that they are playing in the divisions twice a year. interesting thing, they have traditionally washington they have a great defense. if they can come out and put together some scoring drives and put points on the board they are are a formidable team in the nfc east. >> greta: it is a little like having donovan mcnabb go from the eagles to the redskins, they are going to play against each other, like brett favre going from the packers to the vikings. both incredible rivalries now they've given away or lost, however you want to describe it, their quarterbacks. >> but minus the i want to play, i want to retire, i want to play, i want to retire fiasco. >> greta: it doesn't have that in terms of everything that you have learned in football, how is that going to help you be a better congressman or is that just a different chapter in your life? >> i think there's a lot of similarities.
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i always step back and look at my background in playing teams sports my whole life taking that approach into congress. it is not about me feeding my ego going to congress. i'm here to take the team concept. listen to what constituents have so say. take that as a leader to d.c. and get changes made. it is not about keeping your political job. making a run at an extended run in office. it is about going down there and making positive changes. >> greta: we are going to be watching your race because it is going to be exciting. thank you for joining us. >> thank you. >> greta: next, senate majority leader harry reid guess on the record. how does he explain the so-called cornhusker kickback? is afraid he's going to lose his reelection fight in november? things get a bit fiery. >> karl rove and president are working to the on something. we can prove that, minutes
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>> greta: now most powerful united states senator goes on the record. senate majority leader harry reid. we went to senator reid's home in searchlight, nevada. why do you think there was such -- i don't want to use a term that overstates it, there
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were a lot of people that didn't like it. more were unhappy with the health care bill than were happy with it. why did you think that? >> because the loud minority made a lot of noise. now that the legislation passed, it is amazing how much different people attitude is. traveling on an airplane people are so nice to me. we have people -- it wasn't that way before. we have people coming, sending me notes in church. i have a disabled daughter, thank you very much for taking care of her. people have changed. even the republicans have changed their tone. i was in salt lake doing church business this past weekend. i was interesting, the newspapers there and the conservative bastion of america, utah, even the republican leaders up there are saying we don't want to change the things that are already in effect we want to improve some of the things that are going to happen
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later. everybody with the rare -- everybody acknowledges with the rare exception what we did was terrific. >> greta: that's such a different sort of concept i have or -- so many people come up to me who are unhappy. when i was in boston, which is such a huge democratic city and of course massachusetts democratic state, people were coming up to me and they would say, five been a democrat my whole life. my entire family has been democrat. i've never voted democrat. i'm so mad at what the democrats are doing in washington on this health care and stimulus bill i'm voting republican. and sure enough, you got a new united states senator, a republican. i heard the opposite. >> well, first of all, massachusetts was a totally unique state. they already had health care they were afraid we were messing with their health care. most states have no health care.
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it wasn't all health care. we had a few other problems. without den greating the campaign or anything about -- denigrating the campaign or anything -- >> greta: coakley? i thought she ran a good campaign. she was up 19 points on december 20th. >> until she came back from her three week vacation? >> >> greta: you met with senator ben nelson and gave the nebraska deal. they were furious about the nebraska deal i think that sunk her. >> perhaps. [ talking over each other ] >> remember the nebraska deal, was terrific for our country. why do i say that? because now everybody has a nebraska deal. every state in the union. >> greta: i don't think a lot of people feel like do you senator on that a lot of people were disturbed about the fact on the eve of the vote that two united states senators meet and president obama had promised transparent. >> all of a sudden, senator
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ben nelson walks out and says i'm going to vote on this. it wasn't your promise on transparent regency. i'm going to vote on this and i got a special deal from my state. the other states are saying what about us? >> did you think it would have been better if i let the bill fail? >> i don't -- >> you're speechless. >> greta: speechless? this is the way it appeared to the american people. this senator senator ben nelson was for sale. that's the way it looked like. it was a sale that all the other american taxpayers are paying for. nobody understood even people in nebraska didn't understand why he this? >> i know fox loves to der rate anything that is democratic in -- better rate anything that is democratic in nature. ben nelson represents his state extremely well. ben nelson a worked on a number of.
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issues. former governor of the state he understands it very well. i knew if i this for nebraska i would have it for everybody that's what happen. and i'm totally comfortable with that >> greta: two things. no one ever said that after he walked out there was a long time before we heard about everybody else getting this. i was surprised that senator nelson didn't say to his constituents what are you complaining about i you something that no ones got. >> i was a little surprised about that myself. >> greta: the fact that he came out so weak with his hat in his hand made me more suspicious why he wasn't. i would have that, i would have expected a different advocacy than the one he gave. i thought that added to sort of like what's up? >> i said ben if i had gotten that for nevada i would have yelled from it the rooftops, he didn't and that's a decision he made.
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>> greta: if you thought everybody was going to get that it day when you senator nelson, why didn't you offer it to everybody? >> bus i didn't have it for everybody at that time. i thought i could get it as we moved along in the legislation and i did. >> greta: you're telling me when the two of you sat down you said ben, nebraska's it now, obviously my words, after we get this passed we go for everybody? >> no. he this for himself he wanted it. i said to myself, good that's a way i can help medicaid in tpheuf and the rest of the country and that's -- in nevada and the rest of the country and that's what i did. but i didn't trumpet it to my other senators. by the time we finished with our meetings in the white house and other places everybody got it. >> greta: next, more with senator reid. the polls do not look good for senator reid they look bad. is he worried he's about to lose his seat?
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karl rove teams up with president obama. really? those two? karl rove in his own words coming up. on the record continues live from caesar's palace in las vegas, next. [ male announcr bobbsinclair.
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trugreen's taught me a lot. like how every lawn is different. some people want a place to play... others, a place to chill. yo, b. but i've learned from trugreen if you treat every lawn special, the sky's the limit. i'm gonna go public next summer. what's crackin, baby?! bobby! [ male announcer ] call 877-trugreen and get a customized plan for a healthy, green lawn, guaranteed. best lesson i've learned? mow on sunny days. lawn's looking good, bobby. my pleasure...ally. [ male announcer ] trugreengo greener. >> this is a fox news alert. i'm ainsley earhardt in new york. this is the latest from mobt coal, west virginia, the scene
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of one of the worst mining disasters in u.s. history. at this hour, the death toll stands at 12, all identified as miners, killed by an explosion. at least nine rescue teams are frantically searching for 10 other missing miners. the massey energy company's upper big branch is located in the rugged mountains of raleigh county, here's the map. it's about 30 miles south of charleston, west virginia. the explosiona was about 3:00 p.m. eastern time, monday afternoon, believed to be caused by methane gas. complicating the rescue efforts, the communications systems of the mine was knocked out. the mine does have extra oxygen and air-tight chambers, enough to keep miners alive for fire days. rescuers are telling us that there is evidence to believe that trapped miners are using that oxygenned it. a short time ago, officials with the mine safety and health administration held a news
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conference in west virginia. here's hay portion of that news conference, recorded earlier from montcoal, west virginia. >> it appears like it was the initial blast. >> you are looking for 14 men? >> ummm... i don't have the numbers in front of me. i think it's 10 men that we are looking for right now. >> you mentioned also the rescue chambers in the mine, what about the [inaudible]? >> it was partially installed. it was not installed on the section that indicated where the people had gone past that point. so we than how many people were in that area but we don't know the exact location. we can assume that if they survived the initial explosion that they would try to make it to one. refuge alternatives. >> may i ask one thing here? as far as the tracking
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communication systems, west virge law requires that we know when people are moving onto a sect t. doesn't require that we track them on the section. so that last reader may be well out by the section, as long as we know that individuals are in in fact on that working section. that's what mr. strickland was referring to and that's exactly what we have. >> you can clarify the numbers? because i heard there were 19 missing and 5 were found dead. >> i believe the numbers for some reason, the company -- there is different areas that miners evacuate from the miefnl and when everything was concluded, right now we have -- we have 5 additional fatalities. and we have 10 more miners that we're actually looking for underground. the one positive thing that we have seen is there is a cache of
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scsrs and that's an area of scsr storage area, or self-rescuers that minorrers would go to if an accident were to occur and there is evidence that scsrs were taken from that area. and that gives us hope that the miners had survived the initial blast, made their way to grab an additional scsr and hopefully -- again, this is just hopeful -- that they would make their way to a refuge chamber, to an area where the air's clean enough for them to breathe and for the rescuers to save them. >> how many were taken? >> i don't know the number. i don't know the number of scsrs that were there, but it was easily seen that there were scsrs that were removed from the storage area. >> you say that it may vary, it may be as small as 5, as many as
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25? >> for some kind of timeline for the lives -- [inaudible]? >> you know, there is really no timeline, but everything seems to be progressing. everyone at the mine site has agreed that there is no reason to slow down or stop. it's a systematic approach. and the same breath, we are moving as quickly as we can and we have not been stopped by any of the gas readings that we have seen. so mr. wooten said, he would expect that to continue in the near future and try to get into the area, close tort place where we would expect the miners to be. >> i know you are not really saying about the 5, what about the 7? >> we have notified the 7 families that their loved ones are deceased. >> and the other ones, you dont know their identities? >> we do not know their identities. the rescue teams are trained to look for survivors and to not remove bodies until the area's been ventilated.
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>> 12 fatalities? >> that's correct. >> how many injured? >> there is two injured that have been taken to area hospitals. >> you earlier mentioned two work crews on the firewall? >> i do not know which once are deceased and which ones are unaccounted for. we just have a total number now. we haven't started tying in to specific people yet. >> how about where -- >> we do not know that. i am sure the state will do a joint investigation, as well as the company after the fact. that's not something that we are looking at right now. we are focused on a rescue operation. and we will deal with the investigation to determine the scpawz location of the explosion later. >> any indication that weather playing a factor? >> of weather? >> yes, sir. >> i don't -- i am not aware any of weather... i don't want to rule anything out until we
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actually will do an investigation. >> and that investigation will not start any time in the near term. and it will be extensive. it will take quite a while. >> just to recap, you were watching the press conference that took place an hour ago in west virginia, some of the officials that are there on the scene, trying to rescue some of these miners. we're being told that there are 10 still trapped. there were 12. some type of explosion, we are told, maybe by methane gas. two were injured and transported to the hospitals there. now, based on what you just heard and the press conference, they're saying that they do evidence to believe that some of the scsrs were taken. those scsrs are self-contained, self-rescue devices. oxygen and air-tight chamber.
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so the rescuers are hope that this men that are trapped are underground and have grabbed the scsrs. we don't know how many have been taken. but up to 20 or 25 are stored in the chambers. so hopefully, all the rescuers underground do have access to the scsrs and to the chambers. we will know more as the rescue crews are able to get to those individuals. they are saying it is not a recovery operation, it is a rescue operation. the chambers are equipped with oxygen in order to keep these folks underground alive, up to four days. i assume that it will not move into a recovery effort for a few days now. they have notified the seven original family members of those that were deceased, we were reporting earlier in the night. since the original 7 were driving in a vehicle away from the mine at the time of the explosion. and they were killed instantly. two others in that vehicle were sent to a hospital.
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since that time, five others have been reported missing and are -- i'm sorry, five others have been reported killed. so a total of 12 have been deceased. we will continue to keep you updated. i think that's all the information we have at this point. keep it here on fox news channel. i will be here at 2:30. if we get more information before that, i will keep you posted. that's 2:30 p.m. eastern time in the morning. i'm ainsley earhardt, we return to "on the record" already in progress. allowing small businesses to get 35% and insurance soon 50%. it is going to be wonderful things that will take place right tpoufpl some of the things that you brought up, if they don't work out right we'll take a look and maybe try time prove the bill. >> we are posting our entire interview on gretawire tomorrow. who does senator reid call the biggest political hack in
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washington?@uñz go to gretawire tomorrow. as you know senator reid is in a fight for his political nevada. tomorrow night his republican challengers to the stat will go on the record do not miss that 10 p.m. eastern, tomorrow night. next the best of the rest. >> this could be the oddest couple. karl rove and president obama joining forces. plus president obama talks about a heartbreak. what does that mean? the heartbreak is caught on tape. tape. you are going♪ raymond james financial advisers understand there's no one exactly like you. with a culture of independence they have the complete freedom to offer unbiased financial advise that's right for your goals. no matter how often.
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>> greta: here the best of the rest! karl rove is working with the government again. sort of. rove appearing in a new psa for the census bureau. >> hi, i'm karl rove. one of my favorite founders is james madison. principle author of the constitution he created an instrument. democracy by writing in a requirement for consent -- to census every 10 years. if you have not mailed back your census form it is not too late. please answer the 10 easy questions almost the same ones he helped write in 1790 learn
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more and thank you. >> greta: president obama, miss america and donny osmond appeared in census bureau ads. the pitcher in chief today. the president took the mound wearing a nationals jacket and showing respect, put on a chicago white sox cap. it wasn't a horrible pitch. a little high and outside, but the president was disappointed. >> we caught you we are going to break down your pitching delivery. >> this is heartbreaking right here. >> 500 frames per second. >> relief a little high. a little early. >> we can work on the release good change-up you are long and lean like cole hamels. >> it breaks your heart you are down there practicing, throwing strikes, heat, come
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out here, it slips out of your hands a little bit, it is heartbreaking. >> greta: check out this video david anderson might be up for father of the year award. he saved his 2-year-old daughter's life when she fell 20 feet into new york's east river. the accident happened at the south street seaport downtown manhattan. he jumped in after his daughter and helped by a mysterious stranger thought to be a french tourist. the tourist hopped in a cab without giving his name after the rescue. the 2-year-old girl is doing fine. there you have the best of the rest. still ahead, guess what we caught on tape here in nevada? harry reid poking fun at governor sarah palin. we'll show you that tape, it can happen anytime, when you least expect it... a regular moment can become romantic. and when it does, men with erectile dysfunction can be more confident in their ability to be ready with cialis. with two clinically proven dosing options, you can choose
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>> greta: 11:00 is almost here, last call. guess what we caught on tape? senate majority leader harry reid poking some fun at former governor sara palin. >> i realized it was on my -- i couldn't write it on my hand, so... >> special. >> okay. we think that was all in good fun that. is your last call. we're closing down shop. thank for being with us tonight. o'reilly factor is next g night fro